Yes abundance allows us to go into nature but one of our very own creation

  1. An increase in the number of yearly wildfires.
  2. An increase in the number of flash floods in forest areas.
  3. A huge uptick in the number of yearly landslides, especially in the Himalayas, but in the Western ghats as well.
  4. A massive surge in the frequency of forest fires all around the country.
  5. Glacial streams and Himalayan lakes drying up earlier in the year than usual. Also, there’s been a massive surge in the frequency and intensity of rain and snowfall in the Himalayas.
  6. Harsh summers, extended rainy seasons, and exceptionally mild winters down South.
  1. Frigid and unbearably cold nights have vanished altogether, negating the need for tents and warmer sleeping bags.
  2. Summers have extended way into the territory of November and December, making it a very sultry camping experience.
  3. A huge surge in unseasonal rain and wildfire activity on the main ridges and valleys that we’ve explored.
  4. An increase in cloudbursts and the ensuing flash floods during the monsoons, invariably removing our regular picturesque campsites from the list of potential campsites and forcing us to camp higher.
  5. A change in the variety of the local flora and fauna in the Eastern Ghats. There’s more frogs and mushrooms than ever before (for more part of the year for something that is usually found only during the monsoons). What was once a dry summer deciduous forest, is increasingly starting to resemble the moisture laden tropical rain forests of the Western Ghats.
  6. A total ban on camping on the peak at many of the official trails in the Western Ghats due to unruly trekkers polluting the place.
  7. Opening up of new campsites and homestays to cater to the influx of new trekkers. All this means deforestation and destruction of old growth forests, something that we are literally there to see.
  8. New restrictions imposed by the forest department like checking of bags, collection of deposit money and returning it back to trekkers only when they present all their disposables intact on returning from a trek, which is a good move.

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I am an avid trekker, content writer, photographer and sports enthusiast. I write about trekking, society, overpopulation, lifestyle and veganism in general.

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Akash

Akash

I am an avid trekker, content writer, photographer and sports enthusiast. I write about trekking, society, overpopulation, lifestyle and veganism in general.

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